Category Archives: Transport sector

Verkoop nieuwe personenauto’s en de klimaatopdracht

Nederlandse wagenpark blijft groeien

Sinds 2000 zijn er 32% meer auto’s op de weg gekomen. Gemiddeld genomen zijn deze 17% zwaarder geworden. De gewichtstoename komt deels door EU-eisen ten aanzien van veiligheid en deels door meer zware auto’s op de weg. Gekeken vanuit ambities van een circulaire economie met beperken grondstofgebruik betekent deze groei in gewicht juist 1,5 keer meer volume aan grondstoffen en materialen. Deze trend ombuigen vraagt in eerste instantie meer openbaar vervoer. Ook stimuleren van kleinere en lichte voertuigen draagt bij.

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RED-2 of European Commission should limit fossil, not renewable fuels

Stagnation of share of renewables in transport in post-2020 period

Since early 2000s biofuels in transport have been supported by policy. For two reasons. One is the contribution they make to carbon reduction and the other for their capacity to reducing the fossil oil dependency of the transport sector. Biofuels are blended in transport fuel. First, the Biofuels Directive (2003/30/EC) targeted a 5.75% share by 2010. Then, the Renewable Energy Directive (RED – 2009/28/EC) set a target for 2020: 10% of energy in road transport should be of renewable origin. The RED also introduced sustainability requirements with minimum GHG-savings. In 2015 the RED was amended to incorporate issues on ILUC (Indirect Land Use Change) and capping the contribution of crop-based biofuels to 7%, shifting the focus to advanced biofuels (Directive 2015/1513/EU).

The proposal for RED II extends its focus to advanced biofuels and renewable fuels (renewable electricity directly or converted to liquid or gaseous fuels) and sees them grow to 6,8%. And it will be this 6,8% share that economic operators will be obligated to fulfill.

2017_sGU_REDII biofuels

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Full Focus on electric vehicles is not enough to bring down carbon emissions in the Netherlands

Although December 2016 shows another record-high for electric vehicles in the Netherlands, also other low-carbon options are urgently needed to further reduce transport emissions.

31,6%, in December 2016, has been the highest share for full electric (FEV) and plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) passengers vehicles in the monthly new car registrations in the Netherlands so far. The previous record was set in December 2015 (24,6% share for EVs). December 2016 showed another important milestone: total EVs registrations has topped over the 100 thousand, since their introduction around 2012. Yet, the EV market uptake in 2016 slowed down and was 36% less than in 2015, mainly due to a sobered fiscal support scheme for PHEVs.

Monthly car registrations in the Netherlands (2014-2016)
Monthly car registrations in the Netherlands (2014-2016)

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Germany will need a trend reversal to reach the 2020 energy and climate targets

Tuesday, March 31, Mrs. Hendricks, the German Minister of Environment, pointed out that after three years of increasing CO2 emissions in Germany, “the trend finally points into the right direction”. Germany saw 4,3% lower CO2 emissions in 2014. It is a start, but a lot has to be done to further decarbonize Germans energy consumption to reach its 2020 energy targets.

Germany presented an ambitious Action Plan to give yet another fierce impulse to the decarbonization of Germany’s energy consumption in december 2014. 2015_SGU_Insights_Germany energy and carbon intensity performance.007Though the ‘Energiewende’ is progressing (see graph), the ambition is challenging, in two ways. Firstly, by 2020 the total CO2-emissions must be 40% less than they were in 1990. Secondly, the total energy consumption must be 20% lower than it was in 2008. However, as the graph shows the downward trend to decarbonize Germany’s energy consumption has flattened. Even though the use of renewable energy has grown dramatically. Obviously decreasing the use of coal will help. But also an ‘Energiewende 2.0’ in oil consumption is urgently needed.

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